> I drive a 15t lorry. If I start work at 0530 and don't finish till 1930, but only do 4.5 hrs driving would that be b

I drive a 15t lorry. If I start work at 0530 and don't finish till 1930, but only do 4.5 hrs driving would that be b

Posted at: 2015-04-14 
Don't forget the EU working directive of a max of 50 hrs per week

For the thumb downers see this link

http://www.truck-driver.co.uk/working-ti...

Depends on when and how many times

Your normal duty hours should not exceed 13 from clock on to clock off but can be up to 15 hours on 2 days per week.

In other words if you did that on more than 2 days per week you would be breaking the law

Ignore the Bears face idiot who does not know what he is on about

Timbo isn't exactly correct either as you can do 3 shortened breaks per 'weekly work period'

A weekly work period is the time between the end of one weekly rest period and the start of the next weekly rest period and can be a maximum of 6 periods of 24 hours.

A daily work period starts at the end of a daily rest period and can last a maximum of 24 hours and MUST finish with a daily rest period of 11 hours which must be totally included in the 24 hours.

You can reduce this rest period to 9 hours three times per week. If you work 15 hours you've automatically taken a 9 hour rest period. 15 + 9 =24 your maximum working day.

In your case you are working 14 hours and then taking 10 hours off. This 10 hours counts as a reduced daily rest period of which you can only take three per weekly working period...

However in transport there is always an 'unless' and your unless is thus.

If at some time during the working day you can take two hours off in one block as well as your normal breaks you can then work what is known as a spilt break which is usually quoted as 3hrs plus 9 but can also be 2 hours plus 10. The 10 hours being taken at the end of the shift and fully enclosed in the 24hour maximum period. There is no limit to the number of split breaks you can take in a working week.

Hi yes as it does include breaks which are compulsory.